Tuesday, April 1, 2014

A = Apollinaire, Guillaume - 2014 A to Z Blog Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on my selection of the artists and the art style movements from the end of the 1800's and into the first half of the 1900's. There are a few exceptions.



G. Apollinaire, 1914, Art Critic, Poet, Writer - WC-PD*


A = Apollinaire, Guillaume
1880 –1918


Wilhelm Albert Wlodzimierz Apolinary Kostrowicki was born a Russian subject in Rome, and spoke French as well as several other languages. He emigrated to France in his teens and changed his name to Guillaume Apollinaire. As a French poet, playwright, short story writer, novelist, and art critic, he was in a prime position to become friends with many artists of the time.

An important poet of the early 20th century, he is considered one of the forefathers of surrealist plays. He is credited with coining the word 'surrealism' in the program notes for a ballet first performed on May 18, 1917. Active as a journalist, Apollinaire was an art critic for the Matin, Intransigeant, and Paris Journal.


Friend of Picasso

Apollinaire was arrested and jailed in September 1911 on suspicion of aiding and abetting the theft of the Mona Lisa, and a number of Egyptian statuettes from the Louvre. He was released a week later, but in the process he implicated his friend, Pablo Picasso. After questioning, Picasso was also exonerated. Vincenzo Peruggia, to whom Apollinaire gave shelter, had committed the thefts. Apollinaire also returned a number of stolen statuettes that were left behind by Peruggia.


Victim of the Flu Pandemic

Apollinaire fought in WWI until he suffered a serious shrapnel wound to the temple in 1916. He would never fully recover from this injury. During the Spanish flu pandemic of 1918, he died at the young age of 38. He is buried in Pere Lachaise Cemetery in Paris.

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Have you ever heard of Apollinaire? Did you know of the thefts from the Louvre? Are you ready for this month of A to Z madness?

Please share in the comments, to let me know you were here. I'll respond. Thanks for visiting!

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.



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References:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guillaume_Apollinaire Wiki about G. Apollinaire

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Image Credit - G. Apollinaire, 1914

This media file is in the public domain in the United States. This applies to U.S. works where the copyright has expired, often because its first publication occurred prior to January 1, 1923.

This image might not be in the public domain outside of the United States; this especially applies in the countries and areas that do not apply the rule of the shorter term for US works, such as Canada, Mainland China (not Hong Kong or Macao), Germany, Mexico, and Switzerland. The creator and year of publication are essential information and must be provided. Photographer: Not applicable or Unknown. Photograph taken with a booth style machine.

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33 comments:

  1. I've read some of his poetry and liked it. Didn't know about him being a suspected art thief!

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    1. You can never tell what your friends are up to. . .

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  2. Great post! Never tired of learning more about history associated with art. You should check out the series Da Vinci's Demons for an interesting perspective on his life and times. Good luck this year with the challenge!

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    1. Thanks for the tip and the luck, Siv. I haven't read Da Vinci's Demons.

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  3. Interesting. I love the part about Picasso and the stolen painting. Great theme.

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    1. Men just can' resist Mona, I guess. (or rather, her value)

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  4. So he knew about the thefts all along?

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    1. Possibly. Since the real thief stayed with him, but he could have hidden them.

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  5. Thirty-eight? Too young. Funny he blamed Picasso for the thefts.

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    1. He was already weakened by the head wound, and that flu was a bad one. It is too young, and he had such promising talents . . .

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  6. He did a lot of living in his 38 years.

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    1. He sounds like a bigger than life kind of guy. Some do pack a lot more in their years, don't they?

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  7. I wonder how his friendship with Picasso fared after the art theft fiasco. Sad about his WWI temple injury and short life. Like Robin wrote, he lived large in his short life.

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    1. Maybe they laughed it off. Head injuries are never good. An Art critic who was more interesting than most.

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  8. How interesting. Modern day people don't realize how deadly flu epidemics were in the past.

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    1. Very true, Susan. Sanitation and vaccines are important.

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  9. considering this guy only lived 38 years he did lead a rather eclectic life. Very interesting, I'm going to enjoy learning. I had heard of Apollinaire, but only knew of him as a poet.

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    1. Probably a good party guy, so he could write about what was happening.

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  10. I've never heard of him - so interesting to read about. And I love his picture. For some reason old black & white photos just have so much character to me.
    Great start to the challenge.

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    1. This was taken in an early photo booth, I found out in researching the photo. How about that? I'm a big fan of old pix.

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  11. Cool facts! Time to get my art on. :)

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    1. Just stop by here, David, for a daily serving. I've noticed a few others talking art too.

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  12. How very cool! He coined the term surrealism? That's awesome.

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    1. I thought so too. I wonder what he meant by using the word 'surreal'. . .

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  13. I'd heard of him, but didn't know his story, nor his involvement in the art theft. :)

    Stories of people who die so young are always pretty sad!

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  14. Nope--never heard of him before now. Sounds like his life story would make a great historical fiction though!

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    1. He lived in interesting times, but also war times.

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  15. Hello D.G. Yes, I'd heard of Apollinaire and the thefts from the Louvre. No wonder there's so much security when you visit. Luckily the Mona Lisa is still there!

    Enjoy the A-Z. I'll be back occasionally!

    Denise

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    1. We were there in September, and it wasn't that crowded at the Louvre. The guards were subtle when I was there.

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  16. HI, D. G.

    LOVE your theme!

    Yes, I heard of the Louvre thefts, but I never heard of Apollinaire.

    Fascinating man!

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    1. Good, then I've told you something new, Michael. With your art background, I was hoping you'd get a chance to visit these posts!

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  17. I've never heard of him, but then that's not unusual since I'm not a big art fan. I like it, but don't know much "about" it. Your blog promises to change that for me!

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