Wednesday, April 2, 2014

B = Braque, Georges, 2014 A to Z Blog Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of a mini-art tour. ART focuses on the artists and the art style movements following Impressionism between the 1850s-1960s. There are exceptions.



Georges Braque, c.1908, Artist, PD*-WC



B = Braque, Georges
1882 – 1963

Georges Braque, French painter, collagist, draughtsman, printmaker and sculptor, was a major artist of the early 20th century. He was born in Argenteuil, Val-d'Oise, and grew up in Le Havre, France. Like his father and grandfather, Georges trained as a house painter and decorator. That changed when he arrived in Paris. In a city dedicated to art, he discovered new ways to paint.

Braque's contributions to Fauvism from 1906 onwards, and his part in the new art movement called Cubism, ensured his work would be remembered. Braque was part of the collective of artists in Paris at the turn of the century.

Frank G. Burgess, an artist, art critic, poet and author in the San Francisco Bay area, wrote an influential article titled, The Wild Men of Paris.  Burgess introduced the Proto-cubists to the United States including Braque, Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, and Jean Metzinger. Proto-cubism was the experimental stage of the art movement that would become Cubism.

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Have you heard of the artist, Braque? Have you seen Cubist style painting or sculpture?

Unfortunately, most of Braque's paintings are not in the public domain until 2034, so I've included a link to one example.

Man With a Guitar 1914 - painting


Please leave a comment to let me know you were here! I'll respond. Thanks for dropping by.

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.



A to Z Blog Challenge, April 2014


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References:

George Braque Wiki
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Braque

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*Image credit for photo of Braque, PD-WC

Georges Braque, 1908, photograph published in Gelett Burgess, The Wild Men of Paris, Architectural Record, May 1910

This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.
This applies to Australia, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years.

You must also include a United States public domain tag to indicate why this work is in the public domain in the United States. Note that a few countries have copyright terms longer than 70 years: Mexico has 100 years, Colombia has 80 years, and Guatemala and Samoa have 75 years, Russia has 74 years for some authors. This image may not be in the public domain in these countries, which moreover do not implement the rule of the shorter term. Côte d'Ivoire has a general copyright term of 99 years and Honduras has 75 years, but they do implement the rule of the shorter term ***

22 comments:

  1. I'm looking forward to your series on Art. Some of the painters you feature will be favorites of mine, others not so much, but it will all be educational.

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    1. Thanks, Inger. Not all of the artists will be my faves either, although most of them are 'of note'. I will try to make it interesting, too.

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  2. Never heard of Braque and not very familiar with Cuban art. I am sure Cuba has a wealth of art to share with the world...maybe someday.

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    1. Sorry if I confused by not explaining cubism adequately, but for the letter C, there will be more detail. Cubism refers to breaking apart the object and rearranging it in a fractured form.

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  3. Cubism is not my favorite art form. BUT, I respect all art. It is looking at something through a different lens.

    Why is his work not available for public viewing until 2034???

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  4. His copyright expires then, so it isn't in the public domain at present. Some of the artists have had duplication scams visited upon their art work, hence there are several with warnings on the images.

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    1. Sorry this didn't show as a reply, but this response is for you, Robin.

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  5. Of course I know of Cubism, but I"m not familiar with this artist. BUT viewing the painting, I've seen it before. I really like! I have a new appreciation for these artists.

    I was trained classically and very really like these works when I was younger, but now... I LOVE the creative energy.

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    1. I had to take an art history course in college to learn to appreciate Cubism. I prefer realistic art as well, but I can now appreciate what they were trying to achieve - they were pushing the boundaries. (like writers are doing with self-pubbing)

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  6. I've seen a bit of the art of Braque. Cubism is an acquired tasted that has, so far, missed my artistic palate! But I can see its appeal. Fascinating post.

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    1. Yes it is an acquired taste, Roland. It's not my preferred choice either, but I know many are not aware of what its purpose was.

      All the featured artists won't be French, although many are. I've tried to include a smorgasbord of artists, during this time of cubism, surrealism, and color experimentation.

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  7. I've never heard of Braque, but I have heard of Cubism. This is going to be a very informative place for the A-Z challenge! I look forward to reading the rest of your posts.

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    1. Thanks, Sherry! Art is subjective, but I've tried to make it interesting. I like the research, too.

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  8. Thanks for introducing me to a new Artist.

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    1. You're welcome. The more you understand about the artist and his work, the more interesting it can become. Thanks for visiting!

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  9. Though I am not familiar with Braque, his work appears similar to that of Picasso during the Cubist period. That is not my favorite style of painting. It appears so chaotic and I prefer mellow.
    Gail visiting for AtoZ

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    1. I think Braque is similar to Picasso as well, which is why I prefer their Cubist work to others.

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  10. Never heard of Braque before, but like Sherry, have heard of and seen Cubism. I actually kind of like the sample you provided to us. I like the colors and that you can actually see what the subject is, more or less. That's one thing I find a bit frustrating for me with Cubist paintings, sometimes I don't "get" it, whatever "it" is supposed to be! Thanks for dropping by and commenting on my blog!

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    1. I agree Lisa, if too many images overlap, it gets a bit confusing.

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  11. art through time - lovely spotlights on these artists!

    and i added captions to my pics, thanks for reminding me!

    happy bday!

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    1. Now, I'll drop by again to see. Thanks, Tara.

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  12. I studied this guy and his mates in high school art. This post really takes me back. :)

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