Thursday, April 3, 2014

C = Cézanne, Paul - 2014 A to Z Blog Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on my selection of the artists and the art style movements from the end of the 1800's and into the first half of the 1900's. There are exceptions.




Self-portrait, 1875, Musee d'Orsay, by P. Cézanne PD-WC*


C = Cézanne, Paul
1839–1906

Paul Cézanne was a French artist and Post-Impressionist painter. He was born in Aix-en-Provence, Provence, France. In Paris, circa 1852, Cézanne met and became friends with Émile Zola, and Camille Pissarro. In the mid 1860s the relationship was that of master Pissarro to disciple Cézanne, which allowed Pissarro's influence to help shape the younger artist.

Cézanne used geometrical shapes and optical illusions in his paintings, as well as the special effects of color. By experimenting with multiple views of the subject (as in stop-motion), the fracturing of the form itself began in a group composed of Picasso, Braque, Metzinger and Gris.


Post-Impressionist:

The Card Players, P. Cezanne, c.1892, PD*-WC


Cézanne's style became the impetus of the Cubism movement and inspired many Post-Impressionists. Both Matisse and Picasso are said to have considered Cézanne as a father figure. In Cubism, objects are broken up, analyzed and reassembled in abstracted form. The object is depicted in a multitude of viewpoints to represent the subject in greater context. The simpler the composition, the easier to see the main object.
 
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Are you a fan of Cézanne's painting? Have you seen his still life paintings? What do you think of the painting shown above, The Card Players?

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here, and thanks for dropping by! I will respond.

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out! Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.




 
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References:

http://www.paul-cezanne.org/  Paintings by Paul Cézanne

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_C%C3%A9zanne Paul Cézanne Wiki

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* Image Credits for paintings:

Paul Cézanne Portrait, PD-WC

This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

The work of art depicted in this image and the reproduction thereof are in the public domain worldwide. The reproduction is part of a collection of reproductions compiled by The Yorck Project. The compilation copyright is held by Zenodot Verlagsgesellschaft mbH and licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License


The Card Players - Image Credit:
PD-WC
This is a faithful photographic reproduction of a two-dimensional, public domain work of art. The work of art itself is in the public domain for the following reason: This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.
This file has been identified as being free of known restrictions under copyright law, including all related and neighboring rights.

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21 comments:

  1. Love his art! One of my favorite painters.

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    1. He is easy to like, his subjects tell a story. Even the still life paintings.

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  2. Yup, Cezanne is another guy I studied in school. And I do love his work, particularly the richness of colour.

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    1. Me too. Yes, nice to know many of you have studied some of these artists!

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  3. I like the painting. I think I was expecting something all broken up (more cubism), but this isn't. Plus, I love to play cards, so I can empathize with the gentleman studying his cards so intensely!

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    1. Cezanne has many interesting paintings, check out the links at the bottom of the post. I want to see the rest of the café. . .in that painting above.

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  4. Nice to get a refresher course on Art history. I do like Cezanne and the post impressionist era.

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    1. Cezanne is one of my favorites, I love his work, but prefer the people paintings. Glad you like the art tour, as I know your daughter is artistic. I remember the drawing from your book tour.

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  5. Interesting that he inspired Picasso.

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    1. All these artists in Paris at the time seemed to help one another and band together like writers did.

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  6. I have multiple thick volumes on Art History and individual artists. The subject has always fascinated me: each of us start with a blank canvas in life -- with the various brushstrokes of our words and actions, we paint a life.

    Like you, I prefer Cezanne's people paintings.

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    1. I'd love to have a look at your art books! We have art books too, and bought two more while in Paris. We do make our own canvas, Roland, and we can't always finish the image until we know ourselves. Friends help us do that.

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  7. I really like Cezanne and this painting you've posted is a special one. I like the feeling I get when I look at it, as if time is a bit bent, but I can still see through it...

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    1. I know what you mean. Glad you liked the choice.

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  8. Replies
    1. If you know who Cezanne is, that's a great start. Thanks for visiting, Shere.

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  9. Yes, I have seen his paintings and I like them. I like the light in the painting, the shadows with the face lit up and the other card player in more light. He has also captured the concentration of a hot card game, I think.

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    1. You said it, Inger. He simplified that moment in the midst of a café.

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  10. I am actually pretty crazy, and while I can appreciate modern art and those who inspired it, a part of my brain demands that all things should be symmetrical and balanced. I can't get that part to shut up. Even while looking at art.

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    1. Art is subjective. We all have our own preferences. What I'm trying to do is to show the info behind the painting, who the artist was. Thanks for visiting.

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  11. I must admit I know very little about art, so your theme is educational for me!

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