Monday, April 28, 2014

X = Xavery, Jan Baptist, Sculptor - A to Z Challenge

ART: Artists, Art Trivia, Art Legends

A glimpse of the ART world, in the manner of an alphabetical mini-art tour. ART focuses on artists and art movements between the 1850's-1960's.
Jan Baptist Xavery lived much earlier than that


Faith, Hope, Love, Strength, and Justice. Statues by Xavery, at The Hague



X = Xavery, Jan Baptist
1697 - 1742

Late Baroque and Neo-classicist
(ornate design,adheres to classical principles of composition and subject matter)


Jan Baptist Xavery, 1697 - 1742, was a Flemish sculptor who lived most of his life in the Netherlands. Son of another sculptor, Albertus Xavery, he was taught by his father before entering the studio of Michiel van der Voort. He stayed until 1719 when he moved to Vienna, then on to Italy. He returned in 1721 and settled in The Hague.



Muses 1739, by Jan Baptist Xavery



In 1725, Xavery became a member of the Confrerie Pictura, the city painters' guild, though he was best known for his portrait sculptures. He married Maria Christina Robart the same year, with whom he had two sons, both who would go on to become painters. Xavery died in 1742, leaving his legacy in stone.

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Have you heard of Jan Baptist Xavery? Do you like Classical or Modern sculpture?

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here, and thanks for dropping by! I'll respond.

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Brought to you by the A to Z Blog Challenge 2014 Team and the originator: Lee of Tossing it Out. Click the A to Z list of participants and read on. Hope to see you again throughout the blogfest.
 




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References:

http://arthistory.about.com/cs/namesxx/p/xavery_jb.htm More on Xavery

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jan_Baptist_Xavery Wikipedia on Xavery


Images:

"Faith", "Hope", "Love", "Strength", and "Justice", Five statues on the façade

Made by the Hague sculptor Jan Baptist Xavery before 1742. Old City Hall, or The Hague.

This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons.
You are free:
  • to share – to copy, distribute and transmit the work
  • to remix – to adapt the work
Under the following conditions:
  • attribution – You must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor (but not in any way that suggests that they endorse you or your use of the work).

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Muses, 1739

Sculpture by Jan Baptist Xavery - St Bavochurch, Grote markt, Haarlem, 1739

This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons. This file is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported license.

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21 comments:

  1. Hi DG - xavary - what a great find ....and his muses are amazing - I'd like to see that sculpture sometime ...excellent educative X ... Cheers Hilary

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    1. I thought so too, not many artists with an X name, but Xavery is an artist who seemed to have a nice calm life in an earlier century.

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  2. I hope my comment went thru I complemented you on Xavery and I'd love to see the Muses sometime ... Cheers Hilary

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    1. It went through fine, Hilary! I would like to see that sculpture, and to celebrate the Muses, we writers need them.

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  3. I was sure you were going to do "Madam X' by Sargent! So I rushed over here to link your post to mine where I wrote a bit about the painting myself. Anyway, always enjoy your erudite posts.

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    1. I almost did do that, loverofwords, but I wanted to show the inside of his studio, with the painting, as many have no idea of what those 'studios' in Paris looked like. And I didn't know about that Woman in the Yellow dress before, so you showed me something new! (Thx-I like being called erudite).

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  4. In many ways I find sculpture more fascinating than paintings. How do you take a lump of rock and with such delicate precision craft something real out of it??? I marvel at sculpture. I spent a lot of time in Europe with my chin dragging the street.

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    1. Perhaps it's the 3D effect of sculpture, Robin. I love sculpture too. (We had dragging chins too) The sculpture on Oscar Wilde's tomb, and Prometheus in the Latin Quarter (a Ossip Zadkine work) made an impression on me as did the sculptural work on the Arc de Triomphe.

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  5. Creativity obviously ran in his family.

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    1. Yes, perhaps one is encouraged more in a family like that. My mother taught me to draw first, and her dad taught her. Musical families have long carried that tradition.

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  6. I'd never heard of Xavery, nor do I even know the difference between modern and classical sculpting, but like Robin, all I know is that I just plain like it. Shaping something into a full size, 3d image is just amazing to me.

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    1. Creating something from a block of stone is a feat; knowing where to chip and not cause a rockquake is another feat. I admire sculpture much, and I've featured a bit of it in my Paris posts. Those categories are only useful for art critics. . .

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  7. I have never before heard of Jan Baptist Xavery, but he left a beautiful legacy in stone. Like Robin, I often find sculpture more beautiful than painting.

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    1. Glad I helped you discover a new sculptor, then.
      I love walking around statues seeing them from every angle.

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  8. I just love to see what people come up with for the letter X. this is so great. I never heard of him, but the statues above are so beautiful. Thanks for introducing him to me and others. If you haven't been there yet, I know you and hubby will both like my X.

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    1. Glad I surprised you. I first saw Rodin, The Thinker in San Fran's Golden Gate park, then we happened upon Prometheus in the Latin Quarter in Paris. I didn't know an Art Nouveau design graced Wilde's tomb until I saw it.
      Nice train shot at your blog. . . XXXX

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  9. I have not heard of this artist! Sculptors amaze me that they can shape blocks of stone into beautiful things.

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    1. They must see the possibilities within the rock, as a carver of wood must also see what can be brought to the surface.

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  10. I like the idea of father and son sculptors. I don't know why, but I have a definite thing for sculpture on architecture so I especially love the top picture.

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    1. I have that same affection for statues on buildings, so Notre Dame is a real favorite.

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  11. No, never heard of him.... But the sculpture is AMAZING!!!!!!

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