Wednesday, April 22, 2015

S = Seurat, Georges-Pierre - Artist, French Faves - A to Z Challenge

An Artist who was point-on in his painting of an era. . .


A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte - WC*  by Georges-Pierre Seurat

S = Seurat, Georges-Pierre


Born December 2, 1859 - March 1891, George-Pierre Seurat was a French Post-Impressionist painter and a draftsman. He is known for his innovative use of drawing media and for devising the painting techniques known as Chromoluminarism
and Pointillism.


His large scale work, A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte, was painted between 1884 - 1886. This painting altered the direction of modern art by initiating Neo-impressionism. It is one of the icons of late 19th Century painting.


Artist Georges Seurat (1859-1891) WC*PD

In 1878, he moved on the Ecole des Beaux-Arts but his formal artistic education came to an end in November 1879, when he left to serve a year of military service.  Seurat's first exhibited work, at the Salon of 1883, was a Conte' crayon drawing of Aman-Jean. 

Georges-Pierre also studied the works of Eugene Delacroix, and his use of colour. He departed from the Impressionist style by preparing for the work with a number of drawings and sketches, before starting on the canvas. Impressionists preferred to work 'in the moment' creating their paintings in the field all in one session, without sketches or previous studies of the subject.



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Cirque
English: The Circus

Georges Seurat,  Le Cirque, WC-PD *


Disillusioned, Seurat and some of the other artists he had met set up a new organization, the Societe des Artistes Independants. His ideas on pointillism influenced his fellow painters, Charles Angrand, Henri-Edmond Cross, Albert Dubois-Pillet and especially Paul Signac.

So, it seems there were Indies in art at the end of the 19th Century, just as there are in writing.

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Have you heard of Seurat? Do you like the pointillism style? 


Please leave a comment to let me know you stopped by, and if you are part of the A to Z Challenge. I'll be sure to check your blog, and reciprocate. If you're not in the challenge, thanks for stopping by to visit! I try to reply to all comments.

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The A to Z Blog Challenge is brainchild of Lee, at Tossing It Out.  Please visit the A to Z blog site to find out more information and the participant list.  There are also Twitter and Facebook presences if you want to check those!




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References and Image Credits:

Georges Seurat Wiki
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Georges_Seurat_019.jpg

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Portrait of Georges Seurat
This image (or other media file) is in the public domain because its copyright has expired.

This applies to Australia, the European Union and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 70 years

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A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte  by Georges-Pierre Seurat, Wikipedia Commons

This is a faithful photographic reproduction of a two-dimensional, public domain work of art.
This work is in the public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.

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Cirque


This work is in the 
public domain in the United States, and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less.The work of art depicted in this image and the reproduction thereof are in the public domain worldwide

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14 comments:

  1. I like Seurat and pointilism, yes. It fascinates me how he could make such amazing paintings with that detailed technique. It's a wonder he didn't damage his eyesight.

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    1. It is a technique that refined the colour experiments the Impressionists were trying to convey. He took it to another level closer to the miscroscopic. It's probably no worse than fine needlework on the eyes.

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  2. I remember studying that first painting in school. I've loved it since. :)

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    1. I've always liked it too, Chrys. Very Edwardian, I think, just judging from the styles (bustles but not so many layers of clothes).

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  3. I don't really know what pointilism is.... Is it that so many things are pointy???

    I bet you're now wishing I'd just stop visiting your blog. Yep, I'm an art dummy.

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    1. I don't mind questions, and here's the definition via Google: Pointillism is a technique of neo-impressionist painting using tiny dots of various pure colours, which become blended in the viewer's eye. It was developed by Georges Seurat with the aim of producing a greater degree of luminosity and brilliance of color" So if blue and yellow make green he would use lots of tiny dots of those two primary colours to make it look green to the human eye, rather than having one solid wash of colour. I had to learn about it in art school and try to do it on a project. It's an exercise in patience.

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  4. Doesn't matter the time, there will always be those doing things independently.

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    1. And Bravo for those who do! Good point, Alex.

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  5. There's a sculpture garden in Columbus, Ohio, based on the Sunday Afternoon painting. It's really interesting to see!

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    1. I would love to see a garden based on a painting, like that. What a great idea someone had.

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  6. I admit to NOT knowing this artist, but I do recognize his work. That would be me at my dumb blonde best, because aside from recognizing the work, I really like it. It seems surreal and real at the same time. Does that make any sense at all?

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    1. There are many artists I don't know as well, so don't worry about admitting anything. I just thought he's unique because of his colour technique and as I tried it , it takes a lot of time to get that effect. Click on the link under the photo and it tells you more about the painting.

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    2. AND I forgot to add, I think it's surreal as well. That's the reason I like it.

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  7. Hi DG - I love Seurat's art and how he experimented and changed the way painting was done .. the first picture is where he shows different social classes and is now in Chicago ..
    He is a fascinating artist .. loved reading more about him .. cheers Hilary

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