Thursday, April 14, 2016

L = LEWIS Carroll, Author, A-Z Blog Challenge 2016

Have you ever. . .

Looked through the Looking Glass at the world on the other side?
Dropped down a rabbit hole following a muttering white rabbit with a watch?


Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson), c.1856

L = Lewis Carroll, Author
Theme = Authors, AtoZ


Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Jan 27, 1832 - Jan 14, 1898, was better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll. He was an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer. His most well-known stories are: Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, and Through the Looking Glass, and other literary nonsense.

Dodgson was a home educated precocious intellect; at seven years, he was reading The Pilgrim's Progress. He kept diaries, a total of 13, between 1853 - 1863. Some pages are missing (4 volumes and 7 pages of text) but no one's saying who the culprit is. This missing period would have been when Dodgson was 21-31 years old and suffering great mental and spiritual anguish, but he also composed his love poetry. There was speculation as to whether the poems may have been autobiographical. . .

Photography was another productive field for Charles Dodgson and he excelled in portraits. One of his favourite subjects was a young girl-one of three sisters-known as Alice Liddell. It was assumed that she was the inspiration for the 'Alice' in his Alice in Wonderland, which was published in 1865. Through the Looking Glass was published in 1871. 

Many questioned the preference Dodgson showed for the young girls, yet there has never been a hint of anything untoward occurring. In Victorian days, young girls were considered the epitome of innocence, and that may have been what Dodgson was trying to capture. Dodgson also authored approximately a dozen books on mathematics (geometry, algebra, logic and etc.). 

Dodgson, better known as Lewis Carroll, died of pneumonia following influenza on January 14, 1898, at his sisters' home. He was two weeks from turning 66 years old.

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Did you know that Lewis Carroll was a pen name for Charles Dodgson? Have you read either of the books mentioned in the post? 

Please leave a comment to let me know you were here and I'll respond. Thanks for dropping by!

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A to Z Challenge - 2016

It's April again and time for the 2016 Blogging from A to Z challenge  This is my 4th year participating in the challenge! (Previous A to Z  posts at the top of my blog page tabs are: Art A-Z, French Faves, Paris, Etc. 

Thanks to originator Lee (Arlee Bird at Tossing It Out), and the co-hosts and co-host teams who make the challenge run smoothly. See the list of participants, and other important information at the A to Z Blog site.  The basic idea is to blog every day in April except Sundays (26 days). On April 1st, you begin with the letter A, April 2 is the letter B, and so on. Posts can be random or use a theme.



Blogging from A to Z Challenge 2016 - Badge

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References

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lewis_Carrol Wiki on Lewis Carroll

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Image
Lewis Carroll (Charles Lutwidge Dodgson). c.1856
This work is in the public domain in its country of origin and other countries and areas where the copyright term is the author's life plus 100 years or less.

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20 comments:

  1. I had no idea Lewis Carroll wasn't his real name! I've read Alice in Wonderland but not the other one.

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    1. Neither did I and I've read both. Perhaps pen names weren't divulged as much in his time, because for some families, certain professions like acting and writing weren't considered 'noble'.

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  2. Interesting post. A lot of writers I know, including me, love photography. I'm not particularly artistic about taking pics but just love to capture a scene or something of interest that might well feature in my writing.

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    1. Photography is one of my passions too, Nicola, perhaps it's the capturing of an image, just like when a writer captures the essence of a moment by using descriptive words.

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  3. I love your author posts. You really have devoted time to them and they are great. I have read both Alice and the Loocking Glass books and love his imagination. Well, who wouldn't.

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    1. You comment makes my morning, Inger. I like knowing a bit more about authors, and what makes them write as they do. . .so the research if fun for me.

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  4. It's amazing to me that someone could write two books and be so influential in so many areas of life. How often do we quote from these books? How many TV shows and/or movies were a direct result of these books? Even songs have references to these two books. Now that is some impactful writing.

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    1. A very interesting point, Robin, I loved the White Rabbit song by Jefferson Starship (Go ask Alice. . .) Yes, a book that reaches prime social status and endures.

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  5. I've read both Alice in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass. I also have a book of his collected works which has some pretty fun logic puzzles in the back.

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    1. The puzzles must be due to his math background. (a friend of mine who excelled in math in college also likes to create puzzles) Nice that you have that book of his collected works.

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  6. Replies
    1. To many, he was brilliant. Unfortunate that he didn't write more 'literary nonsense'.

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  7. Poor Rev. Dodgeson had a stuttering problem. Many of the photographs he took of the young girls were semi-nude.

    There is even a bizarre theory that the anagrams in his books indicate he was Jack the Ripper. Scholars should just leave the poor man alone, right?

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    1. I think they should, Roland, but like Twain, he seems to be the object of suspicion because of the company he preferred. It's easy to look for dirt, but in a day that publishes erotica like Fifty Shades, who is there to judge - certainly not the throngs that preferred to purchase the 'Shades' book.

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  8. I've read Alice in Wonderland. I love fantasy and letting your imagination run wild. I often feel like the Mad Hatter myself.

    Sunni
    http://sunni-survivinglife.blogspot.com/

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    1. Yes, the Mad Hatter was an interesting character, but my fave is the Cheshire Cat!

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  9. I read Alice in Wonderland in middle school and loved it. One of the most gifted authors of all_time.

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    1. What an imagination he had, and I don't think I know of anyone who didn't enjoy it, OE! Thanks for visiting.

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  10. Hi DG - I've read his works and seen some of the films that are so creative ... but he was a talented man - I'd love to see one of his books with the puzzles in. I did know Lewis Carroll was a pen name ... 'they' keep looking at him and his papers and works etc .. but he's inspired many ... in so many ways ...

    Cheers Hilary

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    1. He's being judged by those from a different time and social mores have changed. We are talking about his creative side. I say let him be, one can't discount his works.

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